It’s Day 4 and we’re waking in Springfield, Illinois. While not directly on Route 66, I want to see Lincoln’s tomb.

While Abraham Lincoln played an end-game play around the U.S. Constitution, it was something that needed to be done. Not only was the Union at risk of failing, he saw the evil of slavery. Other politicians have used this as justification for less noble causes, but in the end, Lincoln was justified in the ends truly did justify the means.

Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln

The visit was worth the slight detour. You learn much about the man and his family during the tour. This stately tomb is a reverent place inside. A hallowed spirit fills the air.

Inside the Burial Chamber

Back on Route in Springfield

Back on route in Springfield, we manage to find our way out of town.

“It looks like the road turns right up here Charly,” as I acted as navigator for Charly.

The vibration of the road was a familiar one for me, but a new experience for Charly.

“It’s called cobblestone… or brick, if you like,” as the road became quite quaint looking.

With a vibration in her voice, Charly says, “I hope it is not like this the rest of the way.”

“No, according to everything I’ve read this is a rare section,” I assured her.

We hadn’t got far when I saw a sign to “Becky’s Barn”. We turned off and checked it out. A Route 66 gift shop, the lonely owner was a widower who was once married to “Becky”. After a long visit, he invited us to help remove some of the rubble left in his yard when they repaired the bricks on Route 66.

“Seriously? I can take one?” I excitedly asked.

“Please do. The workers just dumped it here. It’s been here for years and I have to get it cleaned up so I can sell the place. Take as many as you want.”

Charly and I each grabbed a brick as a souvenir of the OLD Route 66.

Broken Bricks Removed from the Original Route 66
Broken Bricks Removed from the Original Route 66

Talkers and Turkeys

Springfield seems like it was days ago, yet it was just this morning. Our stop in Auburn, Illinois, was nice, but that guy could sure talk.

“I read there are turkey tracks in the concrete a little further up the road,” I said to Charly.

“Why were there turkey tracks?” she asks me.

“Because the turkey needed to cross the road,” I said, “Get it… why did the turkey cross the road???”

“To get to the other side???” Charly asked being unsure that I was making a joke.

“Just drive,” I said.

Turkey Crossing Route 66 outside Springfield, Illinois.
Turkey Crossing Route 66

We headed on our way after seeing those turkey tracks in Route 66. It’s kind of funny that they’ve become a historic landmark in their own rite.

“Whoa, what’s THAT,” I said pointing to a rusty looking metal dinosaur.

“Awe, he’s cute. I’m stopping,” Charly says as if I would argue.

Charly Scratching Scoby's Nose
Charly Scratching Scoby’s Nose

Charly jumps out of the car so quickly I don’t think the car had come to a complete stop.

Scratching the nose of this sculpture, you’d think Charly thought he was alive.

“So you like Scooby”, I said.

A voice came from the building nearby, “It’s SCOBY, rhymes with TOBY.”

“Oh,” I said, “I do see that now. There’s only one “O”. Scoby,” I said.

The creator/artist came up and began telling us the story of Scoby. He created it for his grandchildren, and it’s become a Route 66 icon in these parts.

“He’s so cute,” Charly repeated.

I thought she was going to ask if we could take him home. Scoby, that is, not the old man.

He's so cute.
He’s so cute.

The guy would have talked to us all day and in to the night, but I was needing to eat and go to the bathroom — not necessarily in that order.

We politely broke away from our conversation with the very nice old man and drove only a couple of blocks before we found a Hardy’s. Yeah, it’s not iconic Route 66, but they do make a good burger.

Not Iconic, but a Good Burger
Not Iconic, but a Good Burger